Monday, November 28

Blade servers


Introduction

Blade servers are self-contained computer servers, designed for high density. Slim, hot swappable blade servers fit in a single chassis like books in a bookshelf — and each is an independent server, with its own processors, memory, storage, network controllers, operating system and applications. The blade server simply slides into a bay in the chassis and plugs into a mid- or backplane, sharing power, fans, floppy drives, switches, and ports with other blade servers. 

Blade servers are self-contained computer servers, designed for high density. Whereas a standard rack-mount server can exist with (at least) a power cord and network cable, blade servers have many components removed for space, power and other considerations while still having all the functional components to be considered a computer .A blade enclosure provides services such as power, cooling, networking, various interconnects and management - though different blade providers have differing principles around what should and should not be included in the blade itself (and sometimes in the enclosure altogether). Together these form the blade system.

Contents   
                                                                                 
1.ABSTRACT
2.INTRODUCTION
3.WHAT ARE BLADESERVERS?
       BLADE ENCLOSURE
       POWER
       COOLING
       NETWORKING
       STORAGE
       OTHER BLADES
4.USES
5.ADVANTAGES
       AFFORDABLE DENSITY
       FAST DEPLOYMENT
       EASY MAINTENANCE
       MODULAR SCALABILITY
       FLEXIBLE AVAILABILITY
       TECHNICAL RAMIFICATION
6.HISTORY OF BLADESERVERS
7.CONCLUSION
8.BIBILIOGRAPHY

Networking



Computers are increasingly being produced with high-speed, integrated network interfaces, and most are expandable to allow for the addition of connections that are faster, more resilient and run over different media (copper and fiber ). These may require extra engineering effort in the design and manufacture of the blade, consume space in both the installation and capacity for installation (empty expansion slots) and hence more complexity. High-speed network topologies require expensive, high-speed integrated circuits and media, while most computers do not utilise all the bandwidth available.

The blade enclosure provides one or more network buses to which the blade will connect, and either presents these ports individually in a single location (versus one in each computer chassis), or aggregates them into fewer ports, reducing the cost of connecting the individual devices. These may be presented in the chassis itself, or in networking blades.

Blade Server Architecture

Blade servers have introduced the concept of modular computing. With blades, administrators no longer have to manage multiple systems with unique management tools, hardware, etc. Blades and their corresponding management software packages allow for true modular computing. Dell’s blade offering centers around the DellTM PowerEdgeTM  1655MC platform. Administrators can manage Dell blade servers using the Dell OpenManageTM  IT Assistant software that ships with the Dell blade servers. This version of IT Assistant provides complete support for managing all Dell blade servers, as well as other Dell servers, desktops, and portables, in an organization's IT environment.

Systems management has taken a new direction with the arrival of blade servers. No longer is there only the concept of a single monolithic server, which comprises of one chassis enclosing one set of hardware components. Now several self-contained servers, or blades, are contained within a main chassis. Each blade has its own processor(s), memory, I/O subsystem, set of hard drives, operating system (including instrumentation), and other basic server components.

Easy Maintenance 

All critical components of a blade server can be made redundant or hot-swappable, including cooling systems, power supplies, Ethernet controllers and switches, mid- and backplanes, hard disk drives and service processors. Removing a server for maintenance just means sliding the blade out of the chassis — it's no more complex than removing a hot-swap hard disk drive.

Advanced blade server systems offer smart ways of achieving highly sensitive maintenance. Some blade-server components can alert a systems management processor of impending failure hours or even days before failure occurs. Advanced diagnostics direct a servicer directly to a failing part, allowing for quick, efficient restoration. Some blade servers can even be designed to have no single point of failure.

2 comments:

seminar said...

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seminar said...

this is very interesting site where i can grab more information for my carrier


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